Why do babies play with food?

Should you let your baby play with their food?

Yes, it’s okay for your toddler to play with her food — but within reason. Toddlers are experiential learners, so resist the urge to interfere when your child pulls apart, smells or smashes a new food. That’s how they learn! As hard as it may be, it’s best not to comment at all.

Why does my baby play with her food?

Your child might play with her food because she doesn’t like it, is afraid to try it, or is just plain not hungry. Exposing kids to new foods is how they learn to like new foods, and disliking or being afraid of them is natural. … Mealtimes are also when children learn about table manners.

Why is it bad to play with your food?

Whether you’re using detritus or not, playing with your food is a form of fidgeting. It distracts others, and it suggests that the person playing is distracted—more interested in his or her lettuce origami than in the conversation. Food play also shows disdain for your dinner.

Why do babies throw things behind them?

They’re not yet old enough to learn about gravity, but they’re on their way to it. This is also when babies can start playing peekaboo, because they now recognize something is behind the blanket or towel. It helps them developmentally and it’s fun, too.

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When should I stop spoon feeding my baby?

When your baby can bring his or her hands and objects to the mouth (typically around 9 to 12 months), you can slowly decrease mashed/baby foods and offer more finger foods. A child will typically self-feed from 9 to 12 months, and will not use a fork or spoon until after 12 months of age.

How do I encourage my baby to eat?

Tips when giving your baby new foods

  1. Take your time. Allow plenty of time for eating, especially at first. …
  2. Offer different foods. …
  3. Offer less sweet vegetables. …
  4. Be patient. …
  5. Finger foods. …
  6. It can get messy. …
  7. Let your baby guide you. …
  8. Try not to worry.
Children's blog