Should it hurt when my baby latches on?

Why does it hurt when my baby latches on?

Your baby not latching correctly is the most likely cause of breastfeeding pain. Your newborn should have a large portion of the lower part of the areola (the dark skin around your nipple) in her mouth when she feeds, with your nipple against the roof of her mouth, cupped gently underneath by her tongue.

How can I stop my latch from hurting?

Holding your breast between your index and middle fingers while latching on, too close to the nipple – Try supporting your breast between your thumb and fingers, keeping your fingers well back from the areola. Sometimes shaping your breast slightly to match the oval of your baby’s mouth can help.

When does latching stop hurting?

Your breasts will soon “toughen up” a bit and get used to your baby nursing. Until then, it’s normal to feel a small amount of discomfort while your baby latches on and pulls your nipple and areola into his or her mouth. This discomfort should only last for approximately 30 to 45 seconds after latching.

Does the initial latch pain go away?

Some women have nipple pain only when the baby first latches on, then the pain goes away with letdown. This likely will improve over time as your breasts learn to let down your milk more quickly. In the meantime, try nursing on the least sore side first.

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Does it hurt to breastfeed at first?

Tender and sore nipples are normal during the first week or two of your breastfeeding journey. But pain, cracks, blisters, and bleeding are not. Your comfort depends on where your nipple lands in your baby’s mouth.

What does a good latch feel like?

A proper latch should feel like a pull/tugging sensation, not painful, pinching or clamping down (and definitely not “toe-curling, worse than labor, can’t stand this another second” pain). Is baby’s mouth wide open at the corner of her lips? This is also a good sign!

Can baby still gain weight with bad latch?

Some common symptoms of tongue or lip tie are a poor latch, a clicking sound while nursing, gassiness, reflux, colic, poor weight gain or baby gagging on milk or popping off your breast frequently to gasp for air.

Children's blog