Should caretakers share a bed with a baby?

When is it safe to share a bed with baby?

But the practice goes against medical advice in the U.S. The American Academy of Pediatrics is opposed to bed-sharing: It “should be avoided at all times” with a “[full-]term normal-weight infant younger than 4 months,” the AAP writes in its 2016 recommendations for pediatricians.

Is co-sleeping bad for development?

Other concerns with co-sleeping involve the delayed development of infant independence and sleep issues. For example, an infant who falls asleep with its parents in the same bed has been observed to have more sleep problems associated with shorter and more fragmented sleep.

When should you stop bed sharing?

When to Stop Co-Sleeping

The AAP advises against co-sleeping at any time, especially when the child is younger than four months old. The organization also recommends that babies sleep in the same room as their parents, in a crib or bassinet, for at least six months, but preferably a year.

Why do babies sleep better in parents bed?

Research shows that a baby’s health can improve when they sleep close to parents. In fact, babies that sleep with parents have more regular heartbeats and breathing. They even sleep more soundly. And being close to parents is even shown to reduce the risk of SIDS.

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What age is highest risk for SIDS?

More than 90% of SIDS deaths occur before babies reach 6 months of age. Even though SIDS can occur anytime during a baby’s first year, most SIDS deaths occur in babies between 1 and 4 months of age.

Can my newborn sleep with me?

Myth #1: Co-sleeping is always dangerous

If it involves sharing the same bed as baby, most doctors say don’t do it, since it can increase the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). But you can practice safe co-sleeping if you put baby to sleep in a separate bassinet next to your bed—as opposed to in your bed.

Children's blog