Is teenage pregnancy bad?

What’s bad about teenage pregnancy?

Teens during pregnancy appear to be at increased risk of high blood pressure, anemia, premature birth, having low birth weight babies and experiencing postpartum depression.

Is teenage pregnancy safe?

Adolescent mothers aged 10–19 years face higher risks of eclampsia, puerperal endometritis and systemic infections than women aged 20–24 years. Additionally, some 3.9 million unsafe abortions among girls aged 15–19 years occur each year, contributing to maternal mortality, morbidity and lasting health problems.

How can teenage pregnancy affect your life?

Teenage births result in health consequences; children are more likely to be born pre-term, have lower birth weight, and higher neonatal mortality, while mothers experience greater rates of post-partum depression and are less likely to initiate breastfeeding [1, 2].

What is the main cause of teenage pregnancy?

The study found that most of the teenagers fell pregnant at the age of 16 and 19 years. Almost all of them fall pregnant because of lack of parental guidance and role models in the village. Most of them were influenced by their peers who fell pregnant at an early age and were ignorant about contraceptives.

What are positive effects of teenage pregnancy?

Contrary to the predominantly negative effects of adolescent pregnancy most often reported in the literature, many of the pregnant and parenting adolescents reported increased motivations for school and career post-birth as well as other positive effects such as better self-esteem, being proud of their accomplishments, …

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What can we do to prevent teenage pregnancy?

Suggestions for improving the situation included 1) developing a community based approach which utilizes school sex education integrated with parent, church, and community groups, 2) increasing teenage knowledge of contraception, and 3) providing counseling and medical and psychological health, education, and nutrition …

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